Men and Mental Health

In the UK, around one in eight men has a common mental health problem such as depression, anxiety, panic disorder or OCD obsessive compulsive disorder.  As with many mental health statistics, it’s hard to know if the figures really represent what is happening. They can only tell us about mental health problems that have been reported – many cases may go undiagnosed. This may be especially true when it comes to men’s mental health.

  • Three times as many men as women die by suicide.
  • Men aged 40-49 have the highest suicide rates in the UK.
  • Men report lower levels of life satisfaction than women according to the Government’s national wellbeing survey.
  • Men are less likely to access psychological therapies than women: only 36% of referrals to NHS talking therapies are for men.

In addition, men are far more likely than women to go missing, sleep rough, become dependent on alcohol and use drugs frequently. Find out more about how mental health problems affect men and women differently on our statistics page.

While all this can paint a gloomy picture, there is help and support available if you’re worried about your own or someone else’s mental health – see below.

Why don’t men talk about mental health?

Society’s expectations and traditional gender roles play a role in why men are less likely to discuss or seek help for their mental health problems. We know that gender stereotypes about women – the idea they should behave or look a certain way, for example – can be damaging to them. But it’s important to understand that men can be damaged by stereotypes and expectations too.

Men are often expected to be the breadwinners and to be strong, dominant and in control. While these aren’t inherently bad things, they can make it harder for men to reach out for help and open up.

Some research also suggests that men who can’t speak openly about their emotions may be less able to recognise symptoms of mental health problems in themselves, and less likely to reach out for support.

Men may also be more likely to use potentially harmful coping methods such as drugs or alcohol and less likely to talk to family or friends about their mental health. However, research suggests men will access help that meets their preferences and is easy to access, meaningful and engaging. For example, Men’s Sheds provides community spaces for men to connect and chat, often over practical activities.

How can VITAL REMEDY Help you?

Cat at Vital Remedy can work with you using Hypnosis, Homeopathy, Nutrition and Lifestyle changes to help ease your symptoms.  Appointments are online via Video Call and available Worldwide

Book your Call to discuss how we can work together.  Click here to send an email  Contact